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6 January Books You May Have Missed

9 January Reads You May Have Missed

6 January Books You May Have Missed

 

 

Dino Duckling coverDino Duckling by Alison Murray

Even as an egg, Dino Duckling is different from all the other baby ducks. And when he’s born, no one seems to notice that he’s actually a dinosaur! Will he ever really belong? This sweet retelling of “The Ugly Duckling” is perfect for a new generation of children.

 

 

 

 

Bad News by Pseudonymous Bosch (paperback)Bad News cover

The finale of the beloved Bad Books series is now out in paperback! Old friends return and new foes appear as Pseudonymous Bosch answers long-simmering questions in his most exciting adventure ever.

 

 

 

 

The Sweetest Sound cover

The Sweetest Sound by Sherry Winston (paperback)

Sherri Winson’s whimsical, hopeful tale, now in paperback, tells the story of Cadence Jolly. Cadence inherited her mother’s musical soul, but she’s shy as can be. When a recording of her singing leaks, will she slip back into the shadows or find her voice?

 

 

 

 

The Year of the Dog by Grace Lin (paperback)The Year of the Dog cover

Rediscover Grace Lin’s first novel, now with a fresh cover! When Pacy’s mom tells her that the Lunar Year of the Dog is good for friends, family, and finding herself, Pacy starts searching right away… with mixed results. Come along on her journey to figure out why this year of ups and downs may be lucky after all.

 

 

 

 

Mayday paperback coverMayday by Karen Harrington (paperback)

Wayne has always used his love of facts to communicate, but then a series of tragedies takes away his voice. Can he find a way to impress the prettiest girl in school, stand up to his grandfather, and find out how to speak again?

 

 

 

 

The Cruel Prince by Holly BlackThe Cruel Prince cover

The New York Times bestselling book by fantasy veteran Holly Black is full of faerie intrigue, political machinations, and delicious romance. Jude, a human girl living in the faerie court, muse use all her skills and smarts to best wicked Prince Cardan and prove herself worthy in the eyes of the fey.

Underground Railroad Sites in New York State

There are several Underground Railroad sites in New York State where visitors can learn about the journeys of the estimated 30,000 people who passed through the Buffalo-Niagara corridor. The collection of towns along the U.S.-Canada border served as one of the last stops for those on their way to Canada from the early 1800s to the Civil War’s end in 1865.

View of the docks of downtown Buffalo New York
An estimated 30,000 people passed through the Buffalo-Niagara corridor’s collection of Underground Railroad sites. Photo © Denis Tangney Jr./iStock.

The Freedom Crossing Monument (Lewiston Landing Park, Water St., Lewiston), a moving sculpture crafted by local artist Susan Geissler, depicts a dramatic moment in the pursuit of freedom: Lewiston’s Underground Railroad station master, Josiah Tryon, is handing a baby to its fugitive mother.

The small, modest church of Michigan Street Baptist Church (511 Michigan Ave., Buffalo) was built in 1845. It hosted many of the abolition movement’s luminaries, including Frederick Douglass, W. E. B. DuBois, and Booker T. Washington, and functioned as a station on the Underground Railroad. Though hours are irregular, visitors who happen to get lucky will be treated to a rich oral history narrated by clergy.

St. John’s AME Church (917 Garden Ave., Niagara Falls) was one of the first African American churches founded in Niagara County. Fugitive slaves could see the beckoning lights of Canada and freedom from the church’s hillside location.

a docent shares the history of the New York Underground Railroad sites
Personal and group tours of the Freedom Crossing Exhibit at the Niagara Arts and Cultural Center are available by request and advanced notice. Photo courtesy of the Niagara Arts and Cultural Center.

The Niagara Arts and Cultural Center (1201 Pine Ave., Niagara Falls) has a permanent Freedom Crossing Exhibit that offers an introduction to the Buffalo-Niagara region’s geographical and sociopolitical positions in the abolition movement. Guided personal and group tours are available; call ahead to make arrangements.

Housed in what was once the U.S. Customs House and Post Office, the Niagara Falls Underground Railroad Heritage Center (2245 Whirlpool Street, Niagara Falls) was an important site for freedom seekers crossing into Canada. Restoration of the building was recently completed, and it is now the main interpretative center for the Niagara Falls Underground Railroad Heritage Area. A temporary exhibit greets visitors in the Amtrak station next door while a permanent exhibit is being developed.

Located midway between Niagara Falls and Lockport, the Thomas Root Home (3106 Upper Mountain Rd., Pekin) contains a trapdoor leading to a 5-by-10-foot cellar. Here “volumes bound in black,” as the coded messages once read, spent the night before being driven to the border, hidden beneath piles of vegetables. The house is now privately owned, but the station is set amidst a small row of pine trees accessible to the public.


Related Travel Guide

5 Questions with Elizabeth Crook, author of The Which Way Tree

1. What advice would you give to aspiring writers?
I routinely finish chapters in a state of panic without any idea how to start the next one or even a concept of what’s going to happen. So I’m not the best person to give advice about the mechanics of writing. But I have a few suggestions about being a writer:

First, it helps to think of writing as an exercise in craftsmanship, not a romantic undertaking. This puts the work in perspective and gives you patience. Also, you’ll need to weigh criticism with an open mind and revise with impunity, tossing out words, scenes, and characters in the same way you would empty a sinking boat of too much ballast. Learn how to manage the gloom of watching all those loved items sink, while feeling the boat rise. Ask yourself at every turn: do I need this line? This backstory? Do I need this character? Overboard, if the answer is no.

As for characters—assuming they’re human characters—ask yourself: Are they behaving like real people? Are they saying and doing what real people would naturally say and do if they were in the situation I’ve put these characters in? Make them true to their time and place—whenever, wherever that might be. This means resisting the temptation to judge them by your own values. Let them be prejudiced, ignorant, foolish—they cannot all be you—or as you imagine yourself to be. They shouldn’t exist on the page to teach a lesson or march along some pre-determined plot line in order to deliver a message to your readers. Your messages and your meanings will percolate up through the story.

Ignore the ubiquitous counsel to write what you know—where is the fun in that? If writers only write from our own experience and perspective things might get pretty boring. Learn what you don’t know and write about that. But be sure to know what you’re talking about. Don’t skimp on your research.

Also, read aloud what you’ve written to hear what it sounds like. Cadence is important. And jot ideas down as they come to you, or you’ll probably forget them.

2. What were your favorite books growing up?
My mother read to my brother and sister and me every night for hours, all three of us listening in on each other’s books. It wasn’t a quiet reading time—there was a lot of discussion and often cantankerous arguing about characters and how they were behaving. This nightly routine continued into the years after we were old enough to read for ourselves, because we never volunteered to give it up. She read stories that dropped us into times and lives very different from ours, and I especially loved those set in the past: The Faraway Lurs, The Bronze Bow, Black Beauty, everything by Frances Hodgson Burnett, A Certain Small Shepherd, A Penny’s Worth of Character, A Hundred Dresses, Old Yeller and Savage Sam by Fred Gipson, Charlotte’s Web and The Trumpet of the Swan, The Witch of Blackbird Pond, Blue Willow, Little Women, The Colt from Moon Mountain, and Thee, Hannah.  These come to me off the top of my head but there were so many more. I was fascinated by some of the books my brother loved, which often involved more fanciful worlds, but I always felt a deep sense of unease in these made-up places. I could make it through the sorrow of The Little Match Girl freezing to death, or Charlotte growing weaker as she spoke to Wilber from her web: this was real-world sorrow and I felt that I should deal with it and try to understand it. But the unbearable, tortured death of Aslan on the Stone Table in The Chronicles of Narnia?  The unnerving, if brilliant, world of Tolkein? I listened to these books but never loved them with the same credulity and devotion. I felt out of place in those make-believe worlds.
 

3. What are you working on now?
That’s precisely the question I ask myself every day.

4. Who was your favorite character from THE WHICH WAY TREE to write?
Benjamin, my young storyteller, without a doubt. I love his temperament, his voice, his honesty, his earnest desire to please. I admire his absense of self pity and his basic decency. I adore the fact that he can be funny in spite of (and often because of) not having much of a sense of humor himself. I appreciate that he knows his sister intimately and loves her deeply and yet has absolute clarity as to her flaws.

I’ve never written a book in first person before and don’t usually enjoy first-person stories: the narrators can come across as unattractively self-absorbed, always talking about their thoughts and actions and their place in the tale. I did my best to spare Benjamin by having him tell a story that’s not about himself. Instead, he’s telling it for a good reason, under court order, and he doesn’t try to inflate his role. I’m pretty sure he escapes the first-person pitfall of coming across as annoyingly self-important.

5. Did you have actors and actresses in mind when you were writing THE WHICH WAY TREE? Are any of those making it into the film adaptation?
I didn’t—no. My characters, for me, were so much their own people. Actually, it didn’t occur to me the book would be optioned for film; it was an unexpected turn of events that landed an early draft of the manuscript with Robert Duvall. He’s been one of my favorite actors ever since the mini-series of Lonesome Dove, and I’m having a great time working with him.

 

The Which Way Tree by Elizabeth Crook

Posted in Q&A

Hachette Books to Publish the Definitive Account of the Life and Death of Aaron Hernandez from Best-Selling Author and Hernandez Lawyer Jose Baez

January 30, 2018, NEW YORK – Mauro DiPreta, VP and Publisher of Hachette Books, announced today that Hachette Books will publish Unnecessary Roughness: The Life and Death of Aaron Hernandez, the definitive, insider account of the football star’s final days by New York Times bestselling author and Hernandez attorney Jose Baez. Unnecessary Roughness will publish on August 21, 2018 and be available in hardcover and eBook, with an audio edition from Hachette Audio. Executive Editor Amanda Murray acquired North American rights from Frank Weimann at Folio Literary Management.

Unnecessary Roughness is a true, firsthand account of deceased New England Patriot tight-end Aaron Hernandez, his tumultuous life and eventual suicide. Based on countless intimate conversations with Aaron, as well as with his family and friends in the year leading up to his double murder trial, Baez offers an unexpected portrait of the fallen National Football League (NFL) superstar. The book includes shocking revelations and previously unreported details about his mental state, including the catastrophic brain injuries brought on by years of repetitive blows to the head, resulting in the most severe case of chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) ever discovered in a person his age.

Unnecessary Roughness is written with the permission and support of Aaron’s fiancée, Shayanna Jenkins, who remembers Aaron as her high school sweetheart and addresses questions about his sexuality as well as the CTE that ravaged his brain in her passionate foreword for the book. “This is the only insider’s story written by the man who knew him best at the time of tragedy, love, life and death,” Shayanna writes. “I’m glad the truth will finally be told.”

Jose was among Aaron’s closest confidants: “As his attorney I got to know the person, the father, husband and teammate Aaron was. There have been many accounts of the case and Aaron’s final days, but it’s time for the whole story to be told from the inside.”

And about publishing Unnecessary Roughness, Mauro DiPreta says, “Much has been written about the sensational case of Aaron Hernandez, but never has an author been this close to the key players and the man himself. The Truth about CTE and the role it played in Aaron’s downfall may never be known but we are proud to be sharing the truth about Aaron in the hope it will lead to greater understanding and some peace for all involved.”

About Jose Baez:

Jose Baez is one of the most sought-after attorneys in the country. He first gained national attention by successfully defending Casey Anthony in what became one of the nation’s most sensational trials; his Presumed Guilty: Casey Anthony: The Inside Story was a national bestseller in 2012. Baez is the founder of The Baez Law Firm, and handles high-profile cases across the country. He lives in Miami, Florida.

About Hachette Books:

Hachette Books is a division of Hachette Book Group, Inc. whose objective is to publish meaningful and provocative nonfiction.  Hachette Books presents the leading writers in narrative nonfiction, business, science, history, health and wellness, pop culture, sports, and humor. Hachette Book Group is a leading trade publisher based in New York and a division of Hachette Livre, the third largest trade and educational publisher in the world.

 

Contact: Georgina Levitt
Georgina.Levitt@hbgusa.com
212-364-0698

Contact: Michelle Aielli
Michelle.Aielli@hbgusa.com
212-364-1223

15 Essential Albums for a Southern Road Trip

[et_pb_section admin_label=”section”][et_pb_row admin_label=”row”][et_pb_column type=”4_4″][et_pb_text admin_label=”Intro” background_layout=”light” text_orientation=”left” use_border_color=”off” border_color=”#ffffff” border_style=”solid”]

A road trip from Nashville to New Orleans is a musical treat of a trip. Its roots and melodies are as long and deep as the roots of the trees along the Natchez Trace. Blues, country, jazz, Americana, African slave songs, and more can trace some of their development—if not their origins—to time on these roadways.

Here are 15 select albums, from historic to contemporary, with connections to these routes for you to listen to on your road trip to better understand this region of America. They’re arranged (loosely) from north to south; you can follow along to this soundtrack with the road trip itineraries in Moon Nashville to New Orleans Road Trip.

[/et_pb_text][/et_pb_column][/et_pb_row][et_pb_row admin_label=”Row”][et_pb_column type=”1_3″][et_pb_image admin_label=”Chuck” src=”https://moon.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/01/chuckmead.jpg” alt=”Chuck Mead album Journeyman’s Wager” show_in_lightbox=”off” url_new_window=”off” use_overlay=”off” animation=”off” sticky=”off” align=”left” force_fullwidth=”off” always_center_on_mobile=”on” use_border_color=”off” border_color=”#ffffff” border_style=”solid”]

[/et_pb_image][/et_pb_column][et_pb_column type=”2_3″][et_pb_text admin_label=”1. Chuck Mead” background_layout=”light” text_orientation=”left” use_border_color=”off” border_color=”#ffffff” border_style=”solid”]

1. Chuck Mead, “Journeyman’s Wager”

Track 1 is called “Out on the Natchez Trail,” and compresses some of the Trace’s history into a rockabilly beat.

[/et_pb_text][/et_pb_column][/et_pb_row][et_pb_row admin_label=”Row”][et_pb_column type=”1_3″][et_pb_image admin_label=”Ferlin” src=”https://moon.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/01/ferlinhusky.jpg” alt=”Ferlin Husky Album The Essential Recordings” show_in_lightbox=”off” url_new_window=”off” use_overlay=”off” animation=”off” sticky=”off” align=”left” force_fullwidth=”off” always_center_on_mobile=”on” use_border_color=”off” border_color=”#ffffff” border_style=”solid”]

[/et_pb_image][/et_pb_column][et_pb_column type=”2_3″][et_pb_text admin_label=”2. Ferlin Husky” background_layout=”light” text_orientation=”left” use_border_color=”off” border_color=”#ffffff” border_style=”solid”]

2. Ferlin Husky, “Essential Recordings”

Husky was one of the early adopters of the “Nashville sound,” a combination of swing and country.

[/et_pb_text][/et_pb_column][/et_pb_row][et_pb_row admin_label=”Row”][et_pb_column type=”1_3″][et_pb_image admin_label=”Patsy” src=”https://moon.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/01/patsy.jpg” alt=”Patsy Cline album Showcase” show_in_lightbox=”off” url_new_window=”off” use_overlay=”off” animation=”off” sticky=”off” align=”left” force_fullwidth=”off” always_center_on_mobile=”on” use_border_color=”off” border_color=”#ffffff” border_style=”solid”]

[/et_pb_image][/et_pb_column][et_pb_column type=”2_3″][et_pb_text admin_label=”3. Patsy Cline” background_layout=”light” text_orientation=”left” use_border_color=”off” border_color=”#ffffff” border_style=”solid”]

3. Patsy Cline, “Showcase”

Hear more of the quintessential Nashville Sound from Cline’s angelic voice. Start with “I Fall to Pieces.”

[/et_pb_text][/et_pb_column][/et_pb_row][et_pb_row admin_label=”Row”][et_pb_column type=”1_3″][et_pb_image admin_label=”Lynyrd” src=”https://moon.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/01/lynyrdskynyrd.jpg” alt=”Lynyrd Skynyrd album All Time Greatest Hits” show_in_lightbox=”off” url_new_window=”off” use_overlay=”off” animation=”off” sticky=”off” align=”left” force_fullwidth=”off” always_center_on_mobile=”on” use_border_color=”off” border_color=”#ffffff” border_style=”solid”]

[/et_pb_image][/et_pb_column][et_pb_column type=”2_3″][et_pb_text admin_label=”4. Lynyrd Skynyrd” background_layout=”light” text_orientation=”left” use_border_color=”off” border_color=”#ffffff” border_style=”solid”]

4. Lynyrd Skynyrd, “All Time Greatest Hits”

“Sweet Home Alabama,” Lynyrd Skynyrd’s best-known song, name checks Muscle Shoals and its signature musicians known as Swampers, and explains some of the history of the Yellowhammer state. While the song certainly has a controversial history (and Lynyrd Skynyrd are actually from Florida, not Alabama), there’s no denying it’s a bedrock of the South and Southern music.

[/et_pb_text][/et_pb_column][/et_pb_row][et_pb_row admin_label=”Row”][et_pb_column type=”1_3″][et_pb_image admin_label=”Fame” show_in_lightbox=”off” url_new_window=”off” use_overlay=”off” animation=”off” sticky=”off” align=”left” force_fullwidth=”off” always_center_on_mobile=”on” use_border_color=”off” border_color=”#ffffff” border_style=”solid” src=”https://moon.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/01/famestudios.jpg” alt=”Fame Studios album”]

[/et_pb_image][/et_pb_column][et_pb_column type=”2_3″][et_pb_text admin_label=”5. Fame Studios” background_layout=”light” text_orientation=”left” use_border_color=”off” border_color=”#ffffff” border_style=”solid”]

5. “The Fame Studios Story 1961-73”

This two-disc set includes songs from Etta James, Otis Redding, and others who recorded at Muscle Shoals’ Fame Studios.

[/et_pb_text][/et_pb_column][/et_pb_row][et_pb_row admin_label=”Row”][et_pb_column type=”1_3″][et_pb_image admin_label=”Bobbie” show_in_lightbox=”off” url_new_window=”off” use_overlay=”off” animation=”off” sticky=”off” align=”left” force_fullwidth=”off” always_center_on_mobile=”on” use_border_color=”off” border_color=”#ffffff” border_style=”solid” src=”https://moon.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/01/bobbiegentry.jpg” alt=”Bobbie Gentry album Chickasaw County Child”]

[/et_pb_image][/et_pb_column][et_pb_column type=”2_3″][et_pb_text admin_label=”6. Bobbie Gentry” background_layout=”light” text_orientation=”left” use_border_color=”off” border_color=”#ffffff” border_style=”solid”]

6. Bobbie Gentry, “Chickasaw County Child: The Artistry of Bobbie Gentry”

Mississippi native Gentry tells a story of the region in song.

[/et_pb_text][/et_pb_column][/et_pb_row][et_pb_row admin_label=”Row”][et_pb_column type=”1_3″][et_pb_image admin_label=”Elvis” show_in_lightbox=”off” url_new_window=”off” use_overlay=”off” animation=”off” sticky=”off” align=”left” force_fullwidth=”off” always_center_on_mobile=”on” use_border_color=”off” border_color=”#ffffff” border_style=”solid” src=”https://moon.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/01/sunsessions.jpg” alt=”Elvis Presley album The Sun Sessions”]

[/et_pb_image][/et_pb_column][et_pb_column type=”2_3″][et_pb_text admin_label=”7. Elvis” background_layout=”light” text_orientation=”left” use_border_color=”off” border_color=”#ffffff” border_style=”solid”]

Elvis Presley, “The Sun Sessions”

A compilation of some of the works the King of rock n’ roll recorded at Sun Studios in Memphis.

[/et_pb_text][/et_pb_column][/et_pb_row][et_pb_row admin_label=”Row”][et_pb_column type=”1_3″][et_pb_image admin_label=”Smithsonian” show_in_lightbox=”off” url_new_window=”off” use_overlay=”off” animation=”off” sticky=”off” align=”left” force_fullwidth=”off” always_center_on_mobile=”on” use_border_color=”off” border_color=”#ffffff” border_style=”solid” src=”https://moon.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/01/folkways.jpg” alt=”Smithsonian Folkways album Songs of the American Negro Slaves”]

[/et_pb_image][/et_pb_column][et_pb_column type=”2_3″][et_pb_text admin_label=”8. Smithsonian Folkways” background_layout=”light” text_orientation=”left” use_border_color=”off” border_color=”#ffffff” border_style=”solid”]

8. Smithsonian Folkways, “Songs of the American Negro Slave”

Slavery is part of this region’s history; this album documents the songs slaves sang and passed down to the next generation.

[/et_pb_text][/et_pb_column][/et_pb_row][et_pb_row admin_label=”Row”][et_pb_column type=”1_3″][et_pb_image admin_label=”BB King” show_in_lightbox=”off” url_new_window=”off” use_overlay=”off” animation=”off” sticky=”off” align=”left” force_fullwidth=”off” always_center_on_mobile=”on” use_border_color=”off” border_color=”#ffffff” border_style=”solid” src=”https://moon.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/01/bbking.jpg” alt=”BB King album Completely Well”]

[/et_pb_image][/et_pb_column][et_pb_column type=”2_3″][et_pb_text admin_label=”9. BB King” background_layout=”light” text_orientation=”left” use_border_color=”off” border_color=”#ffffff” border_style=”solid”]

9. B.B. King, “Completely Well”

This best seller is a solid representation of the Mississippi Blues King’s work.

[/et_pb_text][/et_pb_column][/et_pb_row][et_pb_row admin_label=”Row”][et_pb_column type=”1_3″][et_pb_image admin_label=”Howlin” show_in_lightbox=”off” url_new_window=”off” use_overlay=”off” animation=”off” sticky=”off” align=”left” force_fullwidth=”off” always_center_on_mobile=”on” use_border_color=”off” border_color=”#ffffff” border_style=”solid” src=”https://moon.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/01/howlinwolf.jpg” alt=”Howlin Wolf album The Definitive Collection”]

[/et_pb_image][/et_pb_column][et_pb_column type=”2_3″][et_pb_text admin_label=”10. Howlin Wolf” background_layout=”light” text_orientation=”left” use_border_color=”off” border_color=”#ffffff” border_style=”solid”]

10. Howlin’ Wolf, “The Definitive Collection”

Understand the blues music of this Mississippi native from this album.

[/et_pb_text][/et_pb_column][/et_pb_row][et_pb_row admin_label=”Row”][et_pb_column type=”1_3″][et_pb_image admin_label=”Paul” show_in_lightbox=”off” url_new_window=”off” use_overlay=”off” animation=”off” sticky=”off” align=”left” force_fullwidth=”off” always_center_on_mobile=”on” use_border_color=”off” border_color=”#ffffff” border_style=”solid” src=”https://moon.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/01/meridianring.jpg” alt=”Paul Burch album Meridian Rising”]

[/et_pb_image][/et_pb_column][et_pb_column type=”2_3″][et_pb_text admin_label=”11. Paul Burch” background_layout=”light” text_orientation=”left” use_border_color=”off” border_color=”#ffffff” border_style=”solid”]

11. Paul Burch, “Meridian Rising”

The Nashville musician created this concept album by imagining a musical autobiography of Jimmie Rodgers.

[/et_pb_text][/et_pb_column][/et_pb_row][et_pb_row admin_label=”Row”][et_pb_column type=”1_3″][et_pb_image admin_label=”Muddy” show_in_lightbox=”off” url_new_window=”off” use_overlay=”off” animation=”off” sticky=”off” align=”left” force_fullwidth=”off” always_center_on_mobile=”on” use_border_color=”off” border_color=”#ffffff” border_style=”solid” src=”https://moon.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/01/muddywaters.jpg” alt=”Muddy Waters album Folk Singer”]

[/et_pb_image][/et_pb_column][et_pb_column type=”2_3″][et_pb_text admin_label=”12. Muddy Waters” background_layout=”light” text_orientation=”left” use_border_color=”off” border_color=”#ffffff” border_style=”solid”]

12. Muddy Waters, “Folk Singer”

Muddy’s acoustic Mississippi Delta roots are on full display on this album.

[/et_pb_text][/et_pb_column][/et_pb_row][et_pb_row admin_label=”Row”][et_pb_column type=”1_3″][et_pb_image admin_label=”tennessee” show_in_lightbox=”off” url_new_window=”off” use_overlay=”off” animation=”off” sticky=”off” align=”left” force_fullwidth=”off” always_center_on_mobile=”on” use_border_color=”off” border_color=”#ffffff” border_style=”solid” src=”https://moon.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/01/civilwar.jpg” alt=”Tennessee Ernie Ford album Civil War Songs”]

[/et_pb_image][/et_pb_column][et_pb_column type=”2_3″][et_pb_text admin_label=”13. Tennessee Ernie Ford” background_layout=”light” text_orientation=”left” use_border_color=”off” border_color=”#ffffff” border_style=”solid”]

13. Tennessee Ernie Ford, “Civil War Songs of the South” and “Civil War Songs of the North”

The country crooner revisits traditional Civil War songs that were likely sung along the Natchez Trace.

[/et_pb_text][/et_pb_column][/et_pb_row][et_pb_row admin_label=”Row”][et_pb_column type=”1_3″][et_pb_image admin_label=”Rebirth” show_in_lightbox=”off” url_new_window=”off” use_overlay=”off” animation=”off” sticky=”off” align=”left” force_fullwidth=”off” always_center_on_mobile=”on” use_border_color=”off” border_color=”#ffffff” border_style=”solid” src=”https://moon.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/01/rebirth.jpg” alt=”Rebirth Brass Band album We Come to Party”]

[/et_pb_image][/et_pb_column][et_pb_column type=”2_3″][et_pb_text admin_label=”14. Rebirth Brass Band” background_layout=”light” text_orientation=”left” use_border_color=”off” border_color=”#ffffff” border_style=”solid”]

14. Rebirth Brass Band, “We Come to Party”

Traditional New Orleans jazz is combined with hip hop and funk on this album.

[/et_pb_text][/et_pb_column][/et_pb_row][et_pb_row admin_label=”Row”][et_pb_column type=”1_3″][et_pb_image admin_label=”Shorty” show_in_lightbox=”off” url_new_window=”off” use_overlay=”off” animation=”off” sticky=”off” align=”left” force_fullwidth=”off” always_center_on_mobile=”on” use_border_color=”off” border_color=”#ffffff” border_style=”solid” src=”https://moon.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/01/tromboneshorty.jpg” alt=”Trombone Shorty album Say That to Say This”]

[/et_pb_image][/et_pb_column][et_pb_column type=”2_3″][et_pb_text admin_label=”15. Trombone Shorty” background_layout=”light” text_orientation=”left” use_border_color=”off” border_color=”#ffffff” border_style=”solid”]

15. Trombone Shorty, “Say That to This”

Troy Andrews (stage name, Trombone Shorty) is one of the high-energy performers of modern New Orleans jazz.

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Set the perfect mood for a Nashville to New Orleans road trip with these 15 essential albums, from historic to contemporary, with connections to this route. Gain understanding for this unique region of the USA with this mix of blues, country, jazz, Americana, and more.

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Best Places and Times to Travel in Georgia

No matter when you go and where you visit, the Peach State is bound to leave a lasting impression. A Deep South state with one of the nation’s most cosmopolitan cities, a physically immense place with a tight-knit, small-town feel, Georgia defies easy labels. Georgia, it seems, is comfortable doing double duty as both the prototypical Southern state of Sherman-scarred legend and Scarlett O’Hara-derived myth, as well as one of America’s engines of lasting change and innovation.

southern live oaks covered in spanish moss in Savannah Georgia
Oak trees are a common sight throughout Georgia, and the humid climate encourages the growth of Spanish moss on branches. Photo © Sean Pavone Photo/iStock.

Here’s what to expect in each region and time of year to help you prepare for your trip.

Where to Go in Georgia

Atlanta

There’s always something to do in one of America’s most dynamic cities, a burgeoning multiethnic melting pot that also has a friendly flavor of the Old South beneath the surface. For every snarled intersection, a delightfully bucolic neighborhood tantalizes with cafés, shops, and green space. Adventurous restaurants and quirky nightlife venues are Atlanta’s specialties.

North Georgia

The Blue Ridge Mountains are the backdrop for this inspiring, scenic area full of waterfalls, state parks, and outdoor adventures for the whole family. The influence of the enormous University of Georgia in Athens pervades the rolling green Piedmont region.

Middle & South Georgia

From Macon to Columbus, the rhythmic heart of Georgia is the soulful cradle of the state’s rich musical tradition—and where its best barbecue is located. The region’s therapeutic value isn’t only found in the legendary Warm Springs that gave solace to FDR. Farther south is the state’s agricultural cornucopia and the home of former president Jimmy Carter, along with the mighty and mysterious Okefenokee Swamp.

Savannah

Georgia’s grand old city isn’t just full of history, though that aspect remains very much worth exploring. Savannah has found new life as an arts and culture mecca, with as many or more things to do on any given day than cities two or three times its size. Come prepared for high tea or a rowdy party; either way, Savannah’s got you covered.

The Golden Isles

History and salt-kissed air meet in the marshes of Georgia’s chains of relatively undeveloped barrier islands. The feeling is timeless and tranquil. The Golden Isles are one of the country’s hidden vacation gems and one of the most unique ecosystems in North America.

When to Visit Georgia

First things first: Georgia gets very hot in the summer. For most parts of the state, August is the month you don’t want to be here. An exception, however, would be North Georgia, where the mountain air keeps things a bit cooler.

Conversely, winters are mild throughout the state except in North Georgia, where many attractions, trails, and even some roads are closed due to ice and snow. Always check ahead.

Autumn leaf-watching season in North Georgia is extremely popular. While there are plenty of great state parks, they fill up well in advance. Because of the general dearth of lodging in the area, you should try to book well in advance for a fall trip to the mountains.

The hurricane threat on the coast is highest in August and September. Obviously there’s no way to plan your trip in advance to avoid a hurricane, but that would be the time when trips, especially by plane, are most likely to be disrupted.

Savannah hotel rooms are difficult to get in the spring and fall, but especially difficult around St. Patrick’s Day in the middle of March.

The Masters golf tournament in Augusta in April fills hotels, vacation rentals, and bed-and-breakfasts for many miles around throughout northeast Georgia and well into South Carolina.

Athens is much slower in the summer since most classes are not in session at the University of Georgia. However, during home football weekends in the fall, hotel rooms may be booked many months in advance.


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Pinterest graphic with photos of an oak-lined street and a swap in Georgia

Super Blue Blood Moon!

On January 31st, we will be able to witness a Super Blue Blood Moon! This happens when a lunar eclipse coincides with a Super Moon that also happens to be the second Full Moon in the same calendar month. Ezzie Spencer, author of Lunar Abundance, tells us a little bit about this very rare occurrence:

A Blood Moon happens during a total lunar eclipse, when the Earth blocks the light from the Sun and the Full Moon appears to turn red in the night sky. A lunar eclipse happens just two or three times a year, always at a Full Moon; but not at every Full Moon. And still, not every eclipse is a total lunar eclipse or Blood Moon — this is the first since 2015. The orbits of the Earth, Moon and Sun need to line up in a certain way for a Full Moon to be a total lunar eclipse or Blood Moon.

Add to this that the Moon has an elliptical orbit, so the Moon will be closer to the Earth (or at perigee) at some Full Moons more than others — when the moon is at perigee, this is called a Super Moon. We often have Super Full Moons. This particular Blood Moon is not super close to perigee, but is still technically a Super Moon.

Add the third element in the lunar trifecta… the current accepted definition of a Blue Moon is when a Moon is the second Full Moon in a calendar month, which only happens once every couple of years. We started 2018 with a Full Moon and we’re ending it with another on 31 January. So with Full Moons bookending the month, we have our Super Blue Blood Moon!

What does it mean? Well, Full Moons tend to amplify, and eclipses tend to accelerate. So make sure you take this opportunity under moonlight on 31 Jan to get super clear about what you want to create in your life, consciously let go of any ties holding you back from your dreams, and move forwards with direction, focus, and perhaps extra speed!

Get the full story on how to work with the Full Moon for more joy, peace and purpose with LUNAR ABUNDANCE, out on March 6.

THE MAP TO EVERYWHERE EVENT KIT

THE MAP TO EVERYWHERE EVENT KIT

Adventure awaits on the waters of the Pirate Stream! The Map to Everywhere series is an epic action-packed journey. The series comes to a mind-blowing conclusion with IRON TIDE RISING. Don’t miss a minute of these fantastic adventures and download the official activity kit for puzzles, games, and more!

DOWNLOAD THE BAD BOOKS EVENT KIT!

Bad Books Event Kit

 Do you read Bad Books? Then you’ll love this Bad Party Kit! Continue the adventures of Pseudonymous Bosch’s outrageous series with this kit chock-full of party game ideas, discussion questions and reproducible activity sheets sure to inspire hours of goofy laughter. You’ll find everything you need for hours of Bad Books-inspired fun. Well, everything except for Spanish-speaking llamas and sneezy dragons—they were too large to fit on these pages.

THE WILD ROBOT BOOK CLUB GUIDE

THE WILD ROBOT BOOK CLUB GUIDE

There’s only two more months until the highly anticipated sequel The Wild Robot Escapes by Peter Brown! It’s time to pull The Wild Robot off your shelf and revisit all the important themes before embarking on a new adventure with Roz. Check the Book Club Guide below for discussion topics and questions.